Venue & Hospitality

Conference Dates: August 27-28, 2018 (10 Plenary Forums - 1Event)
Boston, USA

Hotel Services & Amenities

  • Audio/Visual Equipment Rental.
  • Business Center.
  • Business Phone Service.
  • Complimentary Printing Service.
  • Express Mail.
  • Fax.
  • Meeting Rooms.
  • Office Rental.
  • Photo Copying Service.
  • Secretarial Service.
  • Telex.
  • Typewriter.
  • Video Conference.
  • Video Messaging.
  • Video Phone.
  • ATM.
  • Baggage Storage.

Transportation

About City

Boston is one of the oldest cities and is the capital and most populous city of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States. It has become the latest city to commit to running on 100% renewable energy. Its plenty of museums, historical sights and abundance of live exhibitions for these reason the city gets 16.3 million visitors a year, making it one of the ten most prominent visitor areas in the nation. Boston is surrounded by the "Greater Boston" region. Boston is sometimes called a "city of neighbourhoods" as a result of the bounty of differing subsections; the city government's Office of Neighbourhood Services has authoritatively assigned 23 neighbourhoods. Boston has a humid continental climate. Boston's schools and colleges apply a huge effect on the territorial economy. Boston pulls in more than 350,000 understudies from around the globe, who contribute more than US$4.8 billion every year to the city's economy. Boston has been known as the "Athens of America" for its abstract culture, procuring notoriety for being "the scholarly capital of the United States. City attractions of Boston: Freedom Trail-The three-mile Freedom Trail leads you past - and into - 16 of the city’s principal historic monuments and sites. It’s easy to follow, by the line of red bricks in the sidewalk and by footprints at street crossings. Begin by picking up brochures on the attractions at the Visitor Center in the Boston Common before heading to the State House. Faneuil Hall-Known as the “cradle of liberty,” Faneuil Hall was built in 1740-42 by Huguenot merchant Peter Faneuil as a market hall and presented to the city on condition that it should always be open to the public. The ground floor is still occupied by market stalls; on the upper floor is a council chamber, which in the 18th and 19th centuries was the meeting place of revolutionaries and later, of abolitionists. On its fourth floor is the Ancient and Honourable Artillery Museum, with weaponry, uniforms, and paintings of significant battles.